Media 2019 v2

In the media 2019

December

Age, lifestyle and genes affect male infertility 
Professor Rob McLachlan and Dr Liza O’Donnell
Herald Sun
Courier Mail
Adelaide Now
West Australian

How medical breakthroughs have slashed the cancer death rate
Herald Sun

Meet a Queer Scientist
Joy | Out Loud Proud

Ovarian cancer shrinks by more than 50% in preclinical trial
Labonline

Check-up: Lasers and fatty livers won in biotech this month
Stockhead

Small-Cap’s Action-Packed Performance: BPL, JRL, IVX, KTG and IBX
Kalkinemedia

November

Light therapy emerges as promising treatment for ovarian cancer
Dr Andrew Stephens
Herald Sun
The Daily Telegraph
Adelaide Advertiser
Geelong Advertiser
Hobart Mercury
Weekend West
Courier Mail

Invion share price soars on trial breakthrough
Small Caps
Yahoo! Finance Australia
Stockhead

October

Botox could relieve hayfever
TV | Channel 7 News

Researchers frock up for Frocktober
Herald Sun
Mirage News
National Tribune

Surgery tweak a baby boon
Associate Professor Ryan Hodges and Professor Stuart Hooper
Radio | 3AW, 6PR
Herald Sun
The Daily Telegraph
Courier Mail
Geelong Advertiser

Detecting brain damage in high risk babies
National Tribune
Mirage News

Chlamydia in testicular tissue linked to male infertility
National Tribune
Mirage News
The New Daily

New tool investigates on and off switches for genes
National Tribune
Mirage News

Reducing period pains with better gut health 
National Tribune
Mirage News

September

We’re headed for a sperm drought
Professor Kate Loveland
Herald Sun
Daily Telegraph
Courier Mail
NT News
Kidspot

Delivery determines baby gut bacteria
Dr Samuel Forster
Radio | 3AW, Sonshine FM, Curtin FM, 2GB, 8SUN, 4BC
Herald Sun
Adelaide Advertiser
Courier Mail
Daily Telegraph
West Australian

US$2.07 million awarded to tackle endometriosis
Professor Caroline Gargett
Radio | ABC News, Radio Canberra, ABC AM
SBS podcast 
Science News Wire
Endometriosis News

The 40 most influential Asian-Australians under 40 
Associate Professor Rebecca Lim
Herald Sun
Daily Telegraph
Courier Mail
Adelaide Now
Weekly Times

August

Human from fish – flipping the salt regulation switch
IFL Science

Parkinson’s linked to gene on Y-chromosome in men for the first time
The Conversation 

Diarrhoea-causing bacteria adapted to spread in hospitals
Dr Samuel Forster
Radio | 2GB, 4BC, Curtin FM
Sydney Morning Herald
The Age
WA Today
Brisbane Times

A brighter future for cerebral palsy
National Tribune

July

Funding to combat deadly ovarian cancer
Dr Maree Bilandzic
Radio | ABC, 3MBS FM, 2MCE, 2GB
TV | ABCNine News
West Australian
Adelaide Advertiser
Herald Sun
Courier Mail

A newborn conundrum: Difference in sex development in infants
Endocrine News

Two of us : The married doctors changing lives
The Age

Could flu deaths be relegated to history?
Dr Michelle Tate and Associate Professor Ashley Mansell
Radio | 3AW, ABC, 4BC, 2GB, 6PR, Nova, Triple M
TV | SBS, Nine News, Channel 7, ABC, Sky News, WIN
Herald Sun
West Australian
Adelaide Advertiser
Courier Mail
Northern Territory News
ABC online
ABC
The Mercury

Training to meet demand in growing cell therapy industry
Mirage News

Clinical trials of bacteria pills raise hopes for weight loss
The Age

June

A healthy heart needs a healthy start
Associate Professor Tim Moss
Radio | 3AW
Herald Sun
Courier Mail
Sunday Times

Are these the cells that cause endometriosis?
Labonline.com.au 

‘Star Trek’ treatment: new light on cancer
Dr Andrew Stephens
Sunday Mail
Herald Sun
Daily Telegraph
Courier Mail

May

Closing the gap in our tiniest patients
Dr Stacey Ellery
Herald Sun
Courier Mail
Adelaide Advertiser
Daily Telegraph

May Measurement Month
Monash Leader

Invion cancer drug treatment
Dr Andrew Stephens
The Australian
The Motley Fool
Small Caps
Stockhead
Kalkine Media
Yahoo! Finance
Finfeed

Are DIY gut flora testing kits worth it?
Choice

Free tests help in blood pressure fight
Monash Leader

Placental cells may assist lung function of prematurely born babies
ABC Gippsland

Setting the record straight on home births
Openforum.com.au

April

New neonatal paediatric chair
InvestorDaily
Mirage News

Is ‘contraception jewelry’ about to have a moment?
Fox News

Sunglasses may help in labour
Radio | 3AW
Herald Sun
Courier Mail
Northern Territory News

Cell trial raises stroke hopes
Associate Professor Rebecca Lim
Radio | ABC
TV | SBS, Channel 7, Channel 10
Herald Sun
Channel Nine
Channel Seven
The Senior

White Shirt Campaign
Radio | 3AW, Curtin FM
Herald Sun

IVF bubs thriving as adults
Herald Sun
Courier Mail
Gold Coast Bulletin

A safer birth for complicated pregnancies
TV | Nine News
MSN News

March

Waking up to preterm risk
Associate Professor Flora Wong
Herald Sun

February

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome
Dr Sam Forster
Radio | ABC
Herald Sun
IFL Science
News.com.au

International media
Business weekly
News Medical Life Sciences
EurekAlert
Genomeweb
ZME Science
Science Daily
The Scientist
WIRED

More birth choices for expectant mums
The Mercury

Yiqian Chen

Dr Yiqian Chen completed her PhD in the Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology at the University of Sydney. Dr Chen’s previous work largely centred around the biological functions and therapeutic potential of dipeptidyl peptidases. Her early scientific work helped to establish the safe application of their inhibitors as a therapy for type 2 diabetes and cancer. In late 2016, she started her postdoctoral training in the Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers laboratory at Hudson Institute of Medical Research. Her current work is involved in understanding the role of dipeptidyl peptidases in ovarian cancer. She is also working to establish the direct effects of the photosensitiser on ovarian cancer cells.

Positions Vacant

Positions vacant:

 

Research Officer – Centre for Cancer Research (RES Level A)

Hudson Institute of Medical Research is a not-for-profit, independent medical research institute located at Monash Medical Centre in Clayton, Victoria, Australia. The Institute employs almost 300 research staff, 30 administration/support staff and hosts more than 100 undergraduate and postgraduate students.

The Research Officer will initiate and conduct research in the areas of post transcriptional and epigenetic regulation in colon cancer and intestinal development. The position will use state-of the art technologies (genetically engineered murine models, CRISPR/RNAi, proteomic approaches) to identify and characterize novel oncogenes in colon cancer and dissect their therapeutic relevance.

The position will work with support, guidance and mentorship from senior research staff including Associate Professor Ron Firestein with an increasing degree of autonomy as the researcher gains greater skills and experience.

Demonstrated abilities:

  • Proven to work independently and have publications in peer reviewed journals
  • Experience in the fields of cancer biology, signalling, and transcriptional regulation
  • Technical skills in molecular biology, murine genetics, tissue cell culture, and gene expression analysis

If you are have a Phd or M.D/PhD training in cancer bology, molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry, or a related discipline with excellent communication skills are extremely organised with innovative problem solving skills then we welcome your application.

Please apply via: https://form.jotform.co/60666965704870

Position open until a suitable candidate is appointed.

Funding wins for The Ritchie Centre

Researchers from the Hudson Institute’s The Ritchie Centre have been successful in obtaining $30,000 in funding from the Jack Brockhoff Foundation for an important study that will investigate sleep apnoea in children with Down Syndrome.

Associate Professor Gillian Nixon and Prof Rosemary Horne were awarded the funding for their project, titled Optimising daytime functioning in children with Down Syndrome through the early identification of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is extremely common in children with Down Syndrome, but the condition is not normally investigated or treated as part of clinical care.

OSA can have a significant impact on the learning, behaviour, cardiovascular system and quality of life of developing children, but its effects are yet to be studied in children with Down Syndrome.

This study will provide a better understanding of the effects of OSA on the day-to-day lives of children with Down Syndrome, especially adaptive functioning (skills of daily living).

The early detection and appropriate treatment of OSA in children with Down Syndrome would help to maximise their potential and minimize cardiovascular problems in children with this condition.

Dr Lisa Walter has also been awarded funding by the Australian and New Zealand Children’s Haematology/Oncology Group (ANZCHOG) to organise a concept development workshop for the planning of her study on sleep in children with cancer.

Her project is titled Bright light therapy to improve sleep, reduce fatigue and improve the quality of life in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia during maintenance treatment, with the workshop to allow interstate collaborators to meet and develop the concept and establish roles and responsibilities.

Dr Walter was also successful in obtaining a travel grant to attend the ANZCHOG conference in Cairns next June to present the preliminary findings of her study.

 

 

PhD students poster competition finalists

Nour NicolasHudson Institute PhD students Rukmali Wijayarathna and Nour Nicolas were both named finalists in the Endocrine Society of Australia and Society for Reproductive Biology’s (ESA-SRB) Annual Conference’s Student Poster Presentation Award competition late last month.

Nour and Rukmali are both participants in the International Research Training Group, a program between Monash University and Justus Liebig University, Giessen.

Nour, an exchange student from Germany, was named the competition winner for her presentation poster on the role of activin A and follistatin in testicular autoimmune orchitis, specifically experimental autoimmune epididymo-orchitis (EAEO), or inflammation of the testis.

Nour is studying her PhD under Associate Professor Mark Peter Hedger in the Centre for Reproductive Health. The data she has obtained so far indicates Activin A may play a role in promoting inflammation in EAEO in the mouse testis.

This data indicates that treatment with exogenous follistatin to attenuate activin A bioactivity early in testicular inflammation may reduce damage to spermatogenesis in patients with this condition.

“Many people took a great interest in our posters and a lot of people turned up and had a genuine interest and asked a lot of questions,” Nour said.

Rukmali’s research focuses on the role of activin and its binding protein follistatin in the structure and function of the epididymis and vas deferens.

She will spend one year in Germany on exchange as part of the program in 2016.