Hudson Institute welcomes Young Women in Science

Hudson Institute has created a new program for young women designed to encourage them to consider a career in medical research. The inaugural Hudson Institute of Young Women in Science program was funded as part of a concerted effort by the federal government to increase the number of women in science.

The new program will offer an immersive laboratory experience for nine young women who are currently in Year 10 at schools in our local community in Melbourne’s southeast.

Inspiring the next generation

Aspiring young scientists and mentors at Hudson Institute

Female scientists at Hudson Institute make up almost three quarters of our staff and students. The Institute has a female CEO and is proud to be home to high profile female scientists working in reproductive and child health, endocrinology, immunology and cancer.

‘We are excited to launch this unique opportunity that gives young women an insight into the fascinating science underpinning current medical research and which will hopefully inspire future research leaders’ said Hudson Institute Young Women in Science education coordinator, Dr Jemma Evans.

The inaugural ‘Hudson Institute of Young Women in Science’ program begins on Monday, 17 June 2019. The students from Brentwood, Wellington and Pakenham Secondary Colleges will join a Hudson Institute laboratory group each day for two weeks and each will be mentored by a female scientist.

The program will include enrichment activities across embryology, cell therapies, clinical trials and cutting edge microscopy. It will culminate with a presentation afternoon on Thursday, 27 June when the students will showcase what they have learnt to their teachers, parents and scientists.

Hudson Institute scientists acting as female mentors for the inaugural program are Dr Mirja Krause, Dr Mary Speir, Dr Rukmali Wijayarathna, Dr Sarah Marshall, Dr Rebecca Ambrose, Dr Stacey Ellery, Dr Heidi Bildsoe, Dr Te-Sha Tsai and Dr Rimma Goldberg.

A step towards greater representation

Hudson Institute CEO Prof Elizabeth Hartland said, ‘While women are increasingly represented in the STEM workforce senior leaders in the sector are still predominantly men. We hope this program will give these young women the courage and confidence to aim high leading to a greater representation of women as STEM leaders in the future. The support from the federal government is invaluable to the success of our program and demonstrates their commitment to achieving STEM equality’.

While the program is funded by the Federal Government for two years it is hoped that this will become a flagship initiative for the Institute to support and encourage the female scientists of the future.

Hudson Institute warmly welcomes the first ever ‘Hudson Institute Young Women in Science’ intake to the institute.

Contact us

Hudson Institute communications
t: + 61 3 8572 2697
e: communications@hudson.org.au