Defining maternal to cure pregnancy disorders-fetal interactions critical for pregnancy to cure pregnancy disorders

Defining maternal to cure pregnancy disorders-fetal interactions critical for pregnancy to cure pregnancy disorders is a Research Project for the Research Group, under the Defining maternal to cure pregnancy disorders-fetal interactions critical for pregnancy to cure pregnancy disorders.

Project Leaders

ivfSpecific Projects:

  • Maternal tolerance of pregnancy: regulation at the decidual-trophoblast interface
  • Defining human decidual-placental trophoblast cell crosstalk to cure pregnancy disorders

Successful implantation of a human embryo into the maternal endometrium leads to a healthy placenta, and a healthy baby. Impaired implantation results in inadequate placentation often leading to complications such as miscarriage, preeclampsia and even maternal death.  We aim to determine how fetal-trophoblast cells interact to invade through the maternal endometrium to form a healthy placenta.

Embryo implantation involves the adhesion, migration, and invasion of the placental trophoblast into the maternal deciduas, remodelling the endometrial arteries to sequester blood to the developing placenta. These highly regulated processes are critical for pregnancy success – inadequacies in which can have far-reaching consequences. We believe that abnormalities in the trophoblast invasion contribute to the development of such pregnancy complications. We are still building our understanding of the maternal decidual and fetal placental interactions, which has hindered our progress in diagnosing and treating pregnancy disorders associated with placental insufficiency including preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, miscarriage, and preterm birth. There is no way of determining if placental development is adequate and no effective treatment for diseases such as preeclampsia.

Our team is investigating decidual-trophoblast interactions using novel techniques including proteomics and epigenetics. We have identified a number of key molecules that facilitate trophoblast invasion. We are continuing to investigate these findings to determine whether they may be useful for the development of much needed diagnostic and therapeutic tools for major diseases associated with pregnancy.

Collaborators:

University of Tokyo
University of Melbourne