Towards an early detection test for ovarian cancer

The Active Ratio Test represents an exciting step forward in innovative ovarian cancer research. Should it be successful, a test as simple as taking a swab or blood sample will result in the early detection of ovarian cancer in women who otherwise exhibit no symptoms.

Vague and misleading symptoms, combined with the need for invasive surgery for diagnosis, are what currently contribute to most women only being diagnosed in the advanced stages when the five-year survival rate is less than 30 per cent.

This test has the potential to improve survival rates to more than 90 per cent.

Watch a short video below of Dr Maree Bilandzic discussing this exciting project.

Next steps: clinical trials

The Active Ratio Test project is currently at the stage of a prospective trial, which will involve recruiting 100 women per year for three years. These are women who have inherited gene mutations, putting them at higher risk of breast and ovarian cancers.

Traditionally, these women might choose to undergo invasive, preventative surgery—like the removal of ovaries and fallopian tubes. But during this trial, they will be monitored using the Active Ratio Test. A simple swab will collect samples, which will then be tested for the presence of early ovarian cancer, and potentially pre-cancerous lesions.

Should their samples test positive for early-stage disease, they will be able to take immediate action.

Once the trial is successful with this high-risk group, a larger clinical trial will be established to introduce the Active Ratio Test as a screening tool for the general population. The long-term goal of this project is to develop a test that becomes part of a woman’s regular screening schedule.

It will mean earlier medical intervention is possible. It will mean a far better prognosis for Australian women, who will no longer live with the threat of ovarian cancer.

These goals can only be achieved with further funding that will propel this exciting project forward.

The Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation (OCRF ) is seeking to raise $45,000 that will help to ensure this project reaches its full potential.

Your tax-deductible gift will part-fund one of our researchers for another year—a researcher whose project is working towards a promising early detection test method.

Please donate now. Your tax-deductible gift to the Early Detection Research Appeal will help this important project move forward, and save the lives of Australian women.