Influenza

Over the past decade there has been a rise in hospitalisations and deaths due to influenza (flu). There are around 3500 deaths in Australia linked to the flu each year and 18,000 hospitalisations.

While vaccination can help prevent the flu, when patients with severe flu are admitted to hospital there are no effective drugs available to reduce the response to the virus.  Hudson Institute inflammation researchers are focusing on finding treatments to help these patients.

What is influenza?

Flu complications

How do you prevent the flu?

What are treatments for the flu?

Colds, flu and COVID-19 – are they linked?

Other viral disease research at Hudson Institute | Dengue and Zika viruses

Our influenza research

Our leading scientific teams with expertise in inflammation, infection and immunity hold vital clues to help tackle deadly virus outbreaks. They are working to discover new treatments that can dampen damaging immune responses.

Could flu deaths be relegated to history?

Dr Michelle Tate and A/Prof Ashley Mansell from Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Diseases at Hudson Institute
 

A pre-clinical study has shown that two existing anti-inflammatory drugs could be used to fight the flu at any stage of the infection. The results of this study may have extraordinary implications for preventing severe flu deaths and lead to the development of new ways to treat the flu. The team are testing new drugs and delivery methods to reduce the inflammatory burden of severe influenza infections.

Why do some types of flu make people so sick?

Manipulating the host immune response to improve disease during severe influenza virus infections

New treatments to limit toxic inflammation in lung diseases

Protecting against Zika virus infection

Eliminating Zika and Dengue virus infections

Influenza collaborators

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